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Celebrating Singapore & Malaysia

Perhentian Island

Langkawi in Malaysia

MALAYSIA

Kuala Lumpur KLCC Petronas Towers_edited

MALAYSIA

Travel Guide

Travel Guide

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SINGAPORE

Joo Chiat is a popular street of its res

SINGAPORE

Travel Guide

Travel Guide

DESTINATIONS

There is so much more to Malaysia than Kuala Lumpur and Georgetown! 

 MALAYSIA
DESTINATION INFO

Malaysia Desinatio Info

Arrival and Departure information

To enter Malaysia, your passport must be valid for at least six months and have at least one blank page for the entry stamp. Permission to enter and remain in Malaysia is under the authority of the Malaysian Immigration Department.  Visit the website of the Embassy of Malaysia in Washington D.C. and the Malaysian Immigration Department’s website for more information. If you are planning onward travel after departing Malaysia, please note that many other countries in the region require at least six months’ remaining validity on your passport to enter. You do not need a visa if you are coming for business or tourism for 90 days or less. Immigration officials will place an entry stamp, known as a social visit pass (visa), in your passport authorizing a stay of up to 90 days.  Travelers may apply to the Malaysian Immigration Department for extensions, which may or may not be granted.  You must exit Malaysia using the same passport that you used to enter.  If this passport is replaced for any reason before you depart Malaysia, you must apply with Immigration to obtain a “special pass” (exit permit) in your new passport prior to departing.

Business Hours

Department stores and mall shops typically commence their operations around 10:00 am and remain open until 10:00 pm throughout the week. However, it's important to be aware that in the states of Kelantan, Terengganu, and Kedah, the workweek spans from Sunday to Thursday, with the weekend holiday falling on Friday and Saturday.

Currency & Credit Cards

The unit of currency is Malaysian Ringgit indicated as RM. $1 is roughly equivalent to between RM3.3 - RM4. Bank notes come in denominations of 100, 50, 20, 10, 5 and 1. Banks are open from 9:30am to 4pm, Monday to Friday. You can change money almost everywhere from hotels to banks. You may get the best rate at a moneychanger in a mall or any stores. You can find ATMs ATMs throughout the country. Maybank is one of the largest banks of Malaysia, and Maybank ATMs usually accept all kinds of credit and debit cards. Debit and credit cards from MasterCard and Visa are almost always accepted everywhere, however please note the Discover and American Express credit cards are not widely accepted.  

Clothing 

Out of respect, you should not wear shorts, short skirts or similar clothing when visiting religious sites. Malaya Travel recommends having a light sweater or jacket with you all the time as indoor places, public transportation, etc... tend to over air-conditioned.

Custom Allowance

The following goods may be imported into Malaysia without incurring a customs duty:

  • One litter of alcohol.

  • One carton of cigarettes.

Visitors can bring in as many foreign currency notes as they like, but amounts exceeding US$10,000 or its equivalent in foreign currency has to be declared.

 

Do’s in Malaysia

  • Always leave your shoes outside when visiting someone's home

  • Handshakes are accepted in Malaysia for both genres. Some Muslim women may not shake your hand, simply welcomes you by nodding her fead and smiling. To greet someone, simply say 'Salam' and place your hands over your heart.

  • You should use your right hand for eating, the left for others things to accomplish.

  • The right hand is always used when eating with one’s hand or giving and receiving objects.

  • Taking pictures is usually accepted, you should not have any problems with that (unless government and military objects)

  • Say hello and communicate with people. Local will most likely encounter you and great you with smiles and open heart. Feel free to stop for a chat and make some new friends!

 

Don’ts in Malaysia

  • Malaysia is a Muslim majority country, avoid closed bosy contact (hugging and kissing) with your partner, regardless of any gender.

  • Ladies must cover their shoulders when entering religious sites. Most places offer scarves for visitors.

  • Do not touch the head of an adult and don’t point the bottom of your feet at anyone.

  • It's a good idea to stay calm and not get upset.Locals believe that shouting and getting angry is impolite, and they try to avoid arguments. Even if you face a small problem, it's better to smile and not show anger.

  • Nude and topless sunbathing is not allowed in Malaysia.

 

Electricity

Malaysia uses a friendly voltage of 220 to 240 volts AC, with a frequency of 50 cycles. You'll find three-point square plugs here, so if you're bringing any gadgets from home, make sure to grab an adapter. Most big hotels are happy to lend you one if you ask. 

Embassy in Malaysia

U.S. Embassy Kuala Lumpur

376 Jalan Tun Razak 50400, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

  • Telephone +(60) (3) 2168-4997/4979

  • Emergency After-Hours Telephone +(60) (3) 2168-5000 (press 1 at the recording)

  • Fax +(60) (3) 2148-5801

  • Email klacs@state.gov

Food & Water

No matter where you travel, Malaysia is a culinary heaven! Eating in Malaysia is a culinary journey itself, influenced by the multicultural Malay, Indian, Chinese, and Eurasian communities that call Malaysia home. Street food (hawker) has a huge influence on the country and Malaysians (and Singaporeans alike) are extremely proud of their heritage! In general it is safe to eat not only in restaurants but any local food vendors. Tap water is considered safe to drink in most parts of the country, however we recommend drinking bottled water as you are not accustomed to it. Icecubes are ok to consume. 

 

Healthcare

No vaccinations are required unless traveling from, or passing through, areas infected with yellow fever. The standard of medical facilities at private hospitals excellent and hospitals in Kuala Lumpur are considered among the bests in the world. Malaysia also has a growing medical tourism industry. Health insurance is always recommended, as you will need proof of payment to be treated at a hospital.

Internet & Mobile Data

Many places offer free Wi-Fi connections. Wi-Fi hotspots are widespread in hotels, restaurants, shopping malls and fast food outlets and cafes. Convenience stores sell local pre-paid and top-up SIM cards that offer cheaper rates. Hotlink by Maxis are the two largest providers in the country and they both offer tourist sim packages. These can be purchased at several 7Elevens throughout the country, and also upon arrival at the airport.

Language

Bahasa Malaysia is the national language. Different dialects of Chineese and Tamil is also widely spoken. English is generally spoken everywhere in Malaysia, as it is one of the official languages of Malaysia. 

Religion

Malaysia is a diverse nation with Islam as its predominant religion, followed by 61 percent of the population. The country's constitution ensures religious freedom for all religions, fostering harmonious and tolerant relations among different religious groups. Malaysia recognizes national holidays for Christmas, Chinese New Year, Deepavali, as well as Islamic holidays. This rich tapestry of faiths and traditions coexisting harmoniously contributes to Malaysia's vibrant and diverse cultural landscape.

 

Safety

Serious crimes against travelers are thankfully quite rare in Malaysia, but it's always smart to stay vigilant, especially when it comes to petty theft, particularly in less touristy areas. Whether it's your wallet, camera, or bags, never leave them unattended. Keep a watchful eye on your belongings at all times. It's a good idea to leave your expensive items at home. If you're traveling with valuables like jewelry or important documents, use the safety deposit boxes or in-room safes provided by your hotel. In bigger cities and tourist spots, unfortunately, bag snatching can happen. To prevent this, keep your bags and purses close to you when you're in markets, on the streets, or in crowded places during excursions.

Time Zone

Malaysia is GMT 8+ and does not operate on a daylight-savings system.

 

Tipping

Tipping in Malaysia isn't something you have to do, but it's a nice gesture that's sure to bring smiles. Most eateries include a service charge of around 10-12% in your bill, so you don't need to worry about extra tipping there. WIf a friendly hotel porter helps you with your bags, a tip is appreciated as a thank-you gesture.

Weather

The climate is tropical, with high humidity. Temperatures remain around 30C (86F) throughout the year. The rainy season, which affects mainly the east coast of the peninsula, the north-eastern parts of Sabah and the western part of Sarawak, lasts from November to February.

Emergency Contact Numbers

Call 999 for all emergencies.

 

Disclaimer

The information provided was accurate as of the publication date, but please be aware that it can change without notice. By using this site, you acknowledge that you do so at your own risk, and Malaya Travel LLC cannot be held liable for any damages arising from your use of this site or the information it contains. We retain the right to rectify errors, inaccuracies, or omissions and to modify or update information without prior notification. Your understanding is appreciated.

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Singapore DestintionIno

SINGAPORE
DESTINATION INFO 

 

Arrival and Departure information

Before embarking on your journey to this remarkable country, it is essential to ensure that you possess the necessary travel documents, including the Singapore Arrival Card (also referred to as the SG Arrival Card) and the Electronic Health Declaration. These documents are crucial to gain entry into Singapore and ensure that your trip is smooth and hassle-free. The Singapore Arrival Card is a new and improved version of the old Disembarkation/Embarkation Card (DE Card) to fill out when arriving in Singapore. It's now mandatory for all foreign visitors and permanent residents.
Singapore Arrival Card (SG Arrival Card):
•    The SG Arrival Card is a mandatory requirement for all foreign visitors and permanent residents entering Singapore. It replaces the old Disembarkation/Embarkation Card (DE Card) and must be completed at least 3 days before your scheduled arrival in the country.
•    This card plays a pivotal role in streamlining the entry process and ensuring compliance with Singapore's immigration regulations. Make it a priority to fill out the SG Arrival Card, marking it on your checklist before commencing your journey.
Electronic Health Declaration:
•    In addition to the SG Arrival Card, travelers are also required to complete the Electronic Health Declaration. This document is essential for monitoring and ensuring the health and safety of all individuals entering Singapore.
•    Provide accurate and up-to-date information in the Electronic Health Declaration to contribute to a comprehensive health screening process upon arrival.
Passport Validity and Entry Stamp:
•    Ensure that your passport is valid for at least six months and has a minimum of one blank page for the entry stamp upon arrival in Singapore.
•    For visits of 90 days or less for business or tourism, a visa is not required. The entry stamp, issued through the SG Arrival Card, authorizes a stay of up to 90 days.
•    Travelers wishing to extend their stay beyond the initial 90 days can apply to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority for possible extensions.
Remember to stay informed about any updates or changes in entry requirements by visiting the official website of the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority or contacting the nearest Singapore Embassy or Consulate. 

Business Hours

In Singapore, business hours typically follow a standard schedule. Most businesses operate from Monday to Friday, with the workweek beginning around 9:00 AM or 10:00 AM and concluding by 6:00 PM or 7:00 PM. Lunch breaks commonly occur between 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM. Some businesses may extend their hours, especially in the retail and hospitality sectors, with shopping malls and restaurants often staying open until later in the evening. It's important to note that specific business hours may vary across industries and individual establishments, so checking the operating hours of a particular business in advance is advisable. Additionally, Singapore's business culture values punctuality and efficiency, making it customary for professionals to adhere to established schedules.

Currency & Credit Cards

In Singapore, the official currency is the Singapore Dollar (SGD), divisible into cents. Major credit cards, including AMEX, Visa and MasterCard, are widely accepted, and contactless payments are prevalent. Discover can be used at many places; however it is not as widely accepted as other major cards. It's advisable to inform your bank before traveling. ATMs are accessible for currency withdrawal. Currency exchange services are available, with banks offering competitive rates. Carrying some local currency is recommended for places not accepting cards. 

Clothing 

In Singapore, casual and lightweight clothing is recommended due to the tropical climate. Light, breathable fabrics such as cotton are ideal. Modest dress is appreciated in religious sites, and it's common to remove shoes when entering someone's home. Despite the warm weather, it's advisable to carry a light jacket or shawl, as some indoor spaces may have air conditioning. Comfortable footwear is essential for exploring the city. While Singapore is generally relaxed in its dress code, appropriate attire is expected in formal or business settings.

Custom Allowance

The following goods may be imported into Malaysia without incurring a customs duty:

  • One litter of alcohol.

  • One carton of cigarettes.

Visitors can bring in as many foreign currency notes as they like, but amounts exceeding US$10,000 or its equivalent in foreign currency has to be declared.

 

Do’s in Singapore

  • Be aware of and respectful towards Singapore's cultural norms and traditions, including modest dress in religious sites and removing shoes when entering someone's home.

  • Address people with courtesy titles like Mr., Mrs., or Miss unless invited to use first names. A handshake is a common form of greeting.

  • Smoking is prohibited in many public places, including bus stops, shopping malls, and restaurants. Use designated smoking areas and dispose of cigarette butts properly.

  • The right hand is always used when eating with one’s hand or giving and receiving objects.

  • Taking pictures is usually accepted, you should not have any problems with that (unless government and military objects)

  • Say hello and communicate with people. Local will most likely encounter you and great you with smiles and open heart. Feel free to stop for a chat and make some new friends!

 

Don’ts in Singapore

  • Singapore has strict anti-littering laws. Avoid littering in public spaces and dispose of trash responsibly.

  • Public displays of affection are generally not well-received in conservative settings. Keep physical interactions modest, especially in public spaces.

  • The sale of chewing gum is restricted, and it's not allowed to chew gum in public transportation or other public areas. Be mindful of this regulation.

  • Be aware of Singapore's strict laws on prohibited items, including certain medications and substances. Check and declare any items that may be subject to restrictions upon entry.

  • aywalking is against the law in Singapore. Use designated crosswalks and pedestrian crossings to ensure your safety and adhere to traffic regulations.

 

Electricity

Malaysia uses a friendly voltage of 220 to 240 volts AC, with a frequency of 50 cycles. You'll find three-point square plugs here, so if you're bringing any gadgets from home, make sure to grab an adapter. Most big hotels are happy to lend you one if you ask. 

Embassy in Singapore

U.S. Embassy Kuala Lumpur

27 Napier Road, Singapore 258508

Food & Water

No matter where you travel, both Singapore and Malaysia is a culinary heaven! Eating in Singapore is a culinary journey itself, influenced by the multicultural Malay, Indian, Chinese, and Eurasian communities that call Singapore home. Street food (hawker) has a huge influence on the country and Singaporeans are extremely proud of their heritage! In general, it is safe to eat not only in restaurants but any local food vendors. Tap water in Singapore is safe to drink as it undergoes rigorous purification processes. Bottled water is also widely available and convenient for travelers; however we recommend drinking bottled water as you are not accustomed to local tap water. Icecubes are ok to consume. 

 

Healthcare

Singapore boasts a world-class healthcare system known for its efficiency and high standards. Both public and private healthcare facilities provide excellent medical services. The public healthcare system is managed by the Ministry of Health, ensuring accessibility and affordability for residents.

Internet & Mobile Data

In Singapore, the telecommunications infrastructure ensures widespread access to high-speed internet and reliable mobile data services. Major mobile network operators, including Singtel, StarHub, and M1, offer diverse prepaid and postpaid plans. Wi-Fi is readily available in public spaces, and visitors can easily purchase local SIM cards for convenient and affordable data access. The country has adopted 4G technology, with the progressive rollout of 5G, ensuring fast and efficient connectivity for both residents and travelers.

Language

Singapore is a multilingual and multicultural society with four official languages: English, Malay, Mandarin Chinese, and Tamil. English serves as the primary language for administration and business, promoting effective communication among the diverse population. Malay, Mandarin Chinese, and Tamil are recognized as official languages to reflect the cultural heritage of the Malay, Chinese, and Indian communities, respectively. This linguistic diversity is a testament to Singapore's rich multicultural fabric, fostering a society where residents commonly switch between languages based on context and personal background.

Religion

Singapore is characterized by religious diversity, with various faiths coexisting harmoniously in the multicultural society. The major religions include Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism. Each religion contributes to the country's rich cultural tapestry, and Singapore celebrates public holidays for major religious festivals, promoting understanding and tolerance among its diverse population. The government emphasizes religious harmony, encouraging mutual respect and understanding between different religious communities. This diversity is a significant aspect of Singapore's identity and contributes to the nation's vibrant cultural landscape.

 

Safety

Singapore is widely recognized for its high level of safety and low crime rates. The city-state has a well-maintained urban environment, efficient law enforcement, and strict regulations. Public spaces are generally secure, making it safe for residents and visitors to explore both day and night. Singapore's emphasis on cleanliness and strict adherence to laws contributes to a safe and orderly atmosphere. While it's always advisable to exercise basic precautions, such as safeguarding personal belongings, overall, Singapore is considered one of the safest destinations globally, providing a secure environment for residents and tourists alike.

Time Zone

Malaysia is GMT 8+ and does not operate on a daylight-savings system.

 

Tipping

Tipping is not a common practice in Singapore, as most restaurants and hotels include a service charge in the bill. However, if exceptional service is received, it's appreciated but not expected. In taxis, rounding up the fare is customary. Tipping is generally not a significant aspect of Singaporean culture, and service staff rely on service charges and wages. It's important to be aware of local customs and practices while understanding that tipping is not a standard part of transactions in Singapore.

Weather

Singapore has a tropical climate characterized by high temperatures, high humidity, and consistent rainfall throughout the year. The average temperature ranges from 77°F (25°C) to 88°F (31°C). The country experiences two main monsoon seasons: the Northeast Monsoon (December to March) and the Southwest Monsoon (June to September). The inter-monsoon periods (April to May and October to November) bring increased rainfall. Short, intense rain showers are common, providing relief from the heat. Visitors should be prepared for the warm and humid conditions and occasional rain, making lightweight and breathable clothing essential when exploring Singapore.

Emergency Contact Numbers

Call 999 for all emergencies.

 

Disclaimer

The information provided was accurate as of the publication date, but please be aware that it can change without notice. By using this site, you acknowledge that you do so at your own risk, and Malaya Travel LLC cannot be held liable for any damages arising from your use of this site or the information it contains. We retain the right to rectify errors, inaccuracies, or omissions and to modify or update information without prior notification. Your understanding is appreciated.

Peter Spaits - Malaysia and Singapore Specialist at Malaya Travel

Call

(786) 833-0625

Email

peter@malayatravel.com

Get in touch!

Contacting us is the first step toward your magical vacation in Southeast Asia!

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